New! HUALIEN TAIWAN Travel Guide: Itinerary, Budget, Things to Do 2018

There is a saying in Taiwan that goes: 花蓮的土很黏. It literally translates to: “the soil in Hualien is very sticky.” What it means is that once you set foot in Hualien, you will find it very hard to leave.

I learned about it from Amanda, a Hualien-based friend whom I met on one of my backpacking trips in Palawan. Naturally, I mentioned that I enjoyed my visit to her city so much that when it was time to leave, I was so reluctant to board the train back to Taipei. That’s when she told me about the “stickiness” of Hualien, which has become so legendary that it has become common knowledge in Taiwan.

“When you’re in Hualien,” Amanda said, “it’s so easy to imagine what it would be like to stay here for good and consider actually doing it.” And it’s true. Hualien is very livable, one of the most livable cities I’ve been to. Amanda herself is proof of that. She isn’t from Hualien. She moved there years ago from Singapore and never looked back.

And what happens to those who manage to get out of it after a visit? Well, they find it hard to forget.

Hualien: Know Before You Go

Hualien can refer to either Hualien County or its political and economic center, Hualien City.

I did not know about Hualien either until 6 years ago when I was in Taipei for the first time. I asked our guide which part of Taiwan she would recommend that we visit next. Her answer came quick: Hualien and the East Coast. She even added, “If you could choose only one destination in Taiwan, make it the East Coast.”

The largest county in Taiwan, Hualien County occupies much of the east coast, caught between the mighty Pacific Ocean and Taiwan’s Central Mountain Range. This stellar location gave both the city and the rest of the county their reputation as a place to get up close and personal with nature. Whether it is the mountains or the sea that makes you tick, you’ll effortlessly find Hualien enjoyable. Home to more than 9000 indigenous people, Hualien City also has the largest population of aborigines in Taiwan.

For tourists, Hualien City is well-known as the gateway to Taroko Gorge. Those who wish to explore the famed national park spend their nights in Hualien City. It’s also a great addition to any Taipei itinerary because it offers a complete 180-degree experience. While Taipei is bustling and almost psychedelic, Hualien is calm and almost sedating. Hualien City looks and behaves more like a small town than a city, which I find irresistibly charming.

Here are more things you need to know about Hualien.

  • Language: Mandarin. Standard Chinese and Taiwanese Mandarin are mostly mutually intelligible. But Hakka and Formosan languages are also recognized national languages. Many street signs are bilingual: written in Chinese characters with English translations. But most establishment signs are written in Chinese only.
  • Currency: New Taiwan Dollar (NT$, TWD). NT$ 100 is around USD 3.25, EUR 2.83, SGD 4.5, PHP 175 (as of September 2018).
  • Cost of travel: Low. Taiwan in general is a pretty affordable destination. There are plenty of budget options when it comes to food and accommodations.
  • Modes of payment: Most establishments prefer cash payment, but many of them also accept credit card transactions.
  • Electricity Info: 110V, 60Hz. Type A sockets are most common. Plugs have two flat pins. Type B, with an extra hole for a grounding prong, is also usual.


When is the Best Time to Visit Hualien?

December to April. Hualien enjoys sort of a cross between a tropical rainforest climate and a humid subtropical climate.

Graph courtesy of World Bank
  • December to April. Generally dry and cool. January and February are the driest and coldest months.
  • May to September. Hot and wet. July and August are the rainiest yet hottest months. It’s also when Taiwan is hit by typhoons. Avoid this period if you can help it.
  • October to November. Shoulder months. Not as soaked and hot as the past five months, but generally comfortable.

If you look at the precipitation pattern above, it is very similar to the Philippines but much cooler.

Check the weather before your trip so you know what clothes to pack.


Where to Stay in Hualien

The best place to stay in Hualien? Somewhere close to Hualien Train Station, which is at the center of the city. Staying near the train station ensures that key attractions like Taroko Gorge are easily accessible to you.

Here are the top budget hotels and hostels on Traveloka.

Image provided by Traveloka
  • Hualien Wow Hostel. Check Rates & Availability.
  • Byeyer Hotel Hualien. Check Rates & Availability.
  • Hualien 5FM Homestay-Xinyi. Check Rates & Availability.
  • Travel Inn. Check Rates & Availability.
  • Pick tea hostel. Check Rates & Availability.
  • Beauty Flower B&B. Check Rates & Availability.

  • Search for more Hualien Hotels


    Pocket Wifi Rental and Data SIM in Hualien

    You can make your life easier during your trip by staying connected to the Internet. If you’re entering Taiwan via Taoyuan Airport, you have two options: rent a pocket wifi or purchase a local data SIM.

    Taiwan Local SIM

    Pocket Wifi Rental is more convenient because you just need to connect to the device, which can accommodate up to 5 devices at once. Klook’s wifi rental service also provides unlimited 4G data with no decelaration to 3G. You can pick it up at Taipei Taoyuan Airport. The number of available units so reserve one as soon as you can.

    You can also buy a Welldone 4G SIM Card that will give you unlimited data without worrying about roaming costs. Each sim also allows unlimited incoming calls. It also includes calling credits (NT$300 credit for 5 days, NT$150 credit for 7 days, NT$100 credit for 10 days). If you buy online, you can pick it up at the airpot when you arrive.

    RESERVE A POCKET WIFI HERE

    RESERVE A 4G SIM CARD HERE


    How to Get to Hualien

    Hualien has its own commercial airport, Hualien Airport (HUN). Although it can also handle international, it currently serves mostly domestic flights (to and from Taipei–Songshan, Kaohsiung, and Taichung).

    Most tourists visiting Hualien enter Taiwan through Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport, which is directly connected to numerous major cities in the world.

    If you’re coming from Manila, AirAsia offers the cheapest year-round ticket, sometimes as low as USD33 for a seat. Other airlines don’t even come close. The catch is, the flight leaves just before midnight. (In case you’re wondering: This post is NOT sponsored by AirAsia. Price comparison websites just reveal they offer the lowest fares.) Here’s a quick scan on Traveloka.

    If you’re coming from Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur or Singapore, AirAsia shares the budget crown with Scoot and JetStar. However, some flights require transfers in another ASEAN city.

    SEARCH FOR TAIPEI FLIGHTS


    Taoyuan Airport to Hualien

    The best way to reach Hualien from Taoyuan Airport is to combine the Airport MRT to Taipei Main Station and then the TRA Train to Hualien. Yep, you’ll have to make a stop in Taipei first to catch a high-speed train. Here’s how to do that.

    Your destination should be Taipei Main Station.

    • By Airport MRT. Both Terminals 1 and 2 have their own station: A12 Station for Terminal 1 and A13 for Terminal 2. Operating hours: 6am to 11pm. Travel time: 37 minutes (if Express). Fare: NT$160.
    • By Bus. To book a ticket, go to the Bus Counters near the Arrival section of the terminal. You’ll find it easily. There are a lot of bus signs around the airport. Fare varies depending on bus company, but it’s within the NT$125-145 range. Travel time: about an hour.

    To get from Taipei Main Station to Hualien, follow the steps below.


    Taipei to Hualien

    By Train

    At Taipei Main Station, there are plenty of trains that you can take to get to Hualien so it will all depend on your most convenient schedule. The fastest trains are operated by Taroko Express and Puyuma Express.

    Travel time: around 2 hours 10 minutes.
    Fare: NT$440 one-way

    To see the train timetable or to book tickets, check out this site. If it’s peak season, you might want to book in advance. Otherwise, no need. I traveled in low season and I didn’t have any problem securing a ticket at the station on the day itself.

    Tip! Pick a seat on the left side of the aisle so you get a great view of the Taiwanese coast! I found myself taking lots of pics throughout the journey.

    There’s a cheaper way of doing this: taking the bus to Ludong and then taking the train from there. But it entails a transfer with longer travel time. I would still choose the express train over it.


    By Sightseeing Road Trip

    Here’s another great way of reaching Hualien. Klook offers a sightseeing carpool service from Taipei to Hualien. By joining this, you’ll be sharing a vehicle with other passengers as you make your way to Hualien City. Along the way, you’ll be making stops to see some scenic spots including the following:

    Image provided by Klook
    • Jiufen Old Street
    • Yilan Jimmy Park
    • Nanfang-ao View Platform
    • Qingshui Cliff

    When is it wise to take this carpool tour instead of the train?

    • If you haven’t been to Jiufen prior to the trip, this is a good option because it will make a stop at Jiufen Old Street.
    • If you plan to tour Taroko Gorge DIY-style, you might want to consider this too only because Qingshui Cliff is a bit difficult to reach on your own by public transportation. Having a car service that will take you there can make your life easier. But if you’re joining a Taroko Gorge group tour, this might not be for you. Most pre-arranged Taroko Gorge tours include a stop at Qingshui Cliff so it might be redundant.

    RESERVE A SLOT HERE!


    Things to Do in Hualien

    Taroko Gorge Tour

    Officially named Taroko National Park (太魯閣國家公園), Taroko Gorge is a 19-km-long canyon along the northeastern coast of Taiwan. The area is fully loaded with marble, a product of the tectonic clash between the Eurasian and Philippine plates. The limestone metamorphosed into marble as the plates forced the site to rise half-a-centimeter a year over 100 million years. One of the eight national parks in Taiwan, it offers visitors magnificent views of its rugged landscapes.

    You can tour Taroko Gorge in three ways: by taking the bus (DIY-style) and by joining a group tour. Here are the details of each, along with their pros and cons.

    Taroko Gorge Group Tour

    What’s great about joining a group tour is, you don’t need to worry about anything else. Just show up and a service vehicle will take you to the key spots. You don’t need to worry about memorizing bus schedules or missing the last bus.

    Qingshui Cliff

    One thing that I appreciate about tours is that Qingshui Cliff Scenic Area is often included in the itinerary. Qingshui Cliff is not easy to reach by public transportation on your own, so having a ride to get there skips the hard part. Some tours also make a stop at a few attractions along the way that are outside of Taroko Gorge.

    The downside, of course, is you don’t have control of your time and because most tour itineraries are usually packed, you spend limited time per stop.

    Still, this is a great choice for those traveling with kids or seniors because it eliminates standing in line waiting for the next bus.

    Klook’s Taroko Gorge tour itinerary includes the following sites:

    • Qingshui Cliff Scenic Area
    • Buluowan Plateau
    • Swallows’ Grotto (Yanzikou Trail)
    • Tianxiang
    • Changchun Shrine (Eternal Spring Shrine)
    • Qixingtan Scenic Area

    CHECK RATES or RESERVE A SLOT HERE

    Taroko Gorge By Bus

    The cheapest way of sightseeing in Taroko Gorge is by taking the bus. The beauty of taking the bus is, you have total control of your time. Unlike with group tours, you may choose to stay longer at a certain stop if you feel like it. You may skip a site if it doesn’t interest you. And in case you missed it, it’s cheaper.

    Two bus companies operate around Taroko National Park. Hualien Bus Company controls Buses 1133A, 1133, 1126, and 1141, which all start at Hualien Station. Taroko Bus Company operates Bus 302, which departs from Xincheng Station. All these buses travel to Tianxiang area inside the Taroko National Park and then make their way back to their origins.

    Both companies offer day passes that tourists may use to enjoy unlimited rides. Here are the schedules and rates:

    BUSES FROM HUALIEN STATION (Bus 1133A, 1133, 1126 1141)

    The tickets can be purchased at the bright orange building next to Hualien train station.

    • First trip from Hualien: 06:30am (1126), 7:00am (1133A)
    • Last trip from Hualien: 03:10pm
    • Last trip from Tianxiang: 05:00pm
    • 1-Day Pass: NT$ 250
    • 2-Day Pass: NT$ 400

    BUSES FROM XINCHENG STATION (Bus 302)

    • First trip from Xincheng: 07:10am
    • Last trip from Xincheng: 05:10pm
    • Last trip from Tianxiang: 06:00pm-06:50pm
    • 1-Day Pass: NT$ 150

    The pass issued by one bus company can’t be used to board the other. For example, if you purchase a Bus 1133A day pass, you can’t use it for Bus 302 because it’s by another company. Buses from each line are also around 1 hour apart. Meaning, if you’re holding a 1133A pass and you miss the 1133A bus by a minute, you’ll have to wait for an hour for the next one.

    Hence, the best way to take advantage of BOTH these bus companies isn’t to purchase a day pass from either but to just get an EasyCard, which is Taiwan’s IC card, similar to Hong Kong’s Octopus card, Singapore’s EZ card, or Japan’s ICOCA, PASMO, or SUICA. Both the Hualien buses and Bus 302 accept the Easycard. This way, if you miss a bus, you don’t have to wait for an hour. You just wait for the next bus, whichever comes first, regardless of which company operates it.

    You can purchase an Easycard at convenience stores like 7-Eleven and Family Mart and MRT stations. Cost of the card is NT$100. You will have to load it with credits first before you use it.

    For more information about getting in, out and around Taroko Gorge, read: TAROKO GORGE TRAVEL GUIDE.


    Hsiukuluan River Rafting

    Image provided by Klook

    Hsiukuluan River or Xiuguluan River stems from Taiwan’s Central Mountain Range and flows along the East Rift Valley before reaching the Pacific Ocean. Because of its numerous rapids, it is popular as a river-rafting destination.

    Klook offers a river-rafting tour for the adventurous soul. You’ll have an English-speaking instructor who is a professional rafter. They will teach you the basics and share some safety tips before you go conquering the rapids!

    Meet up is at Hsiang Sun River Rafting Center in Ruisui Township, but you can also include transfers from Hualien when you book.

    CHECK RATES or RESERVE HERE!


    Kayaking at Qingshui Cliff

    Image provided by Klook

    Instead of just admiring it from afar, get a better look at the magnificent Qingshui Cliff while kayaking along the east coast of Taiwan! This 4.5-hour guided tour will allow you to paddle along the mighty cliffs. If your timing is right, you can also enjoy watching a spectacular Pacific sunrise. You’ll have a professional instructor with you to ensure your safety.

    CHECK RATES or RESERVE A SLOT HERE!


    East Coast Tour

    Taiwan’s East Coast is one of the most picturesque places in the whole island. This tour will take you down to the rugged but postcard-worthy shoreline of Shihtihping and up to the farmlands of Fanshuliao. Here are the usual stops:

    • Shihtiping (stone stair terrace)
    • Shihti Fishing Harbour
    • Fanshuliao Valley
    • Hualien Sky Walk
    • Taroko Bridge (rainbow arch bridge)
    • Tropic of Cancer
    • Baqi Gazebo

    CHECK RATES or RESERVE A SLOT HERE!


    Hualien City Tour

    You can totally pull this off DIY-style. Hualien is such a walkable city. Despite its city status, it is quiet, not daunting. Quirky dessert shops and cafes bookend its blocks. Small diners flank its windswept streets.

    Here are some of the attractions you can visit:

    • Martyrs’ Shrine. Formerly known as Karenkō Shrine (花蓮港神社), this Shinto structure was constructed in 1915 to enshrine Prince Yoshihisa and the Three Kami Deities of Cultivation. But after World War II, it was converted into a site that honors the country’s heroes.
      Opening Hours: 09:00am – 05:00pm
      Entrance Fee: FREE
    • Pine Garden. Crowning city’s highest point, it offers a great view of Hualien’s coast. Built in 1943, the Pine Garden is the best Japanese military facility in Taiwan. From its construction until 1945, it housed Japanese military offices.
      Opening Hours: 09:00am – 06:00pm
      Entrance Fee: TWD 50
    • Nanbin Park. This verdant 20-acre space features statues of marine animals and walking and bike trails. Locals sometimes use the area to fly kites. At night, the place transforms into a night market, where food and Taiwanese folk games entertain kids and kids-at-heart alike.
      Entrance Fee: FREE
    • Stone Art Avenue. It showcases 40 boutiques selling stone artworks including jewelry, figurines, and stoneware. At night, locals perform short ethnic dance routines. The show is free.
      Opening hours: 02:00pm – 10:30pm
      Entrance Fee: FREE

    As you may have noticed, almost all of these attractions can be enjoyed for FREE.


    Night Markets

    Taiwan is regarded as Asia’s Night Market Capital. Hualien is not an exception, but one of the most popular is Dongdamen Night Market.

    Local Taiwanese favorites are ubiquitous, but the city’s colonial past manifests itself in the form of Japanese dishes (ramen, sushi, maki, Japanese fried rice).


    Sample Hualien Itineraries

    Below are two sample itineraries: one for 4 days/3 nights and the other is for 3 days/2 nights. Both itineraries assume you’re flying in via Taiwan Taoyuan Airport and then taking the express train to Hualien.

    The prices and times indicated in both samples are just estimates. They’re meant to give just a ballpark figure or targets. The actual costs and schedules may vary. Total cost estimates are bloated. We added a bit of allowance. Better overestimate than under.

    As always, feel free to make adjustments to suit your flight schedule and other preferences.

    Sample Hualien Itinerary: 4 Days

    This 4-day/3-night itinerary assumes you’re booking tours via Klook.

    Day 1: DIY HUALIEN CITY TOUR
    10:05am – Arrival at the airport
    11:00am – MRT to Taipei Main Station, NT$160
    12:58pm – Taroko Express train to Hualien, NT$440
    01:00pm – Arrival at Hualien Station, walk to hotel
    01:30pm – Hotel check in
    02:00pm – Late lunch, NT$150
    03:30pm – Martyr’s Shrine
    04:30pm – Pine Garden, NT$50
    06:00pm – Walk around town
    07:30pm – Night market, Budget: NT$250
    09:00pm – Cab to hotel, NT$100
    10:00pm – Lights out

    Day 2: TAROKO GORGE TOUR
    06:00am – Wake up call
    08:00am – Taroko Gorge Tour, NT$900, Book here!
    06:00pm – Dinner, NT$150
    07:30pm – Stone Art Avenue & Ethnic Dance
    08:30pm – Back to hotel
    09:30pm – Lights out

    Day 3: HSIUKULUAN RIVER RAFTING
    06:00am – Wake up call
    08:00am – Hsiukuluan River Rafting, NT$800, Book here!
    03:00pm – Rest at hotel, freshen up
    05:00pm – Nanbin Park
    07:00pm – Dongdamen Night Market, Budget: NT$250
    09:30pm – Lights out

    Day 4: DEPARTURE
    08:00am – Wake up call, pack up
    10:00am – Hotel check out, leave bags
    11:00am – Lunch, NT$150
    12:30pm – Puyuma train to Taipei, NT$440
    03:30pm – MRT to Airport, NT$160
    04:30pm – Flight check in

    This itinerary will cost you at least NT$4200 (USD137, SGD188, PHP7400, EUR118), excluding airfare and hotel.

    If you spend NT$600 per night per person on accommodations, the itinerary above will set you back at least NT$6000 (USD195, SGD268, PHP10500, EUR167), excluding airfare.

    If you’re flying from Manila and you’re able to snag a roundtrip ticket for only P5000, this itinerary will cost you PHP15,500. You can get something much much lower when there’s a sale.


    Sample Hualien Budget Itinerary: 3 Days

    This is a budget itinerary. It assumes you’re doing all your tours on your own, DIY-style.

    Day 1: DIY HUALIEN CITY TOUR
    10:05am – Arrival at the airport
    11:00am – MRT to Taipei Main Station, NT$160
    12:58pm – Taroko Express train to Hualien, NT$440
    01:00pm – Arrival at Hualien Station, walk to hotel
    01:30pm – Hotel check in
    02:00pm – Late lunch, NT$150
    03:30pm – Martyr’s Shrine
    04:30pm – Pine Garden, NT$50
    06:00pm – Walk around town
    07:30pm – Night market, Budget: NT$250
    09:00pm – Cab to hotel, NT$100
    10:00pm – Lights out

    Day 2: TAROKO GORGE TOUR
    06:00am – Wake up call
    08:00am – Taroko Gorge by Bus, NT$250
    12:00am – Lunch, NT$200
    01:00pm – Continue tour
    06:00pm – Dinner, NT$150
    07:30pm – Stone Art Avenue & Ethnic Dance
    08:30pm – Back to hotel
    09:30pm – Lights out

    Day 3: DEPARTURE
    08:00am – Wake up call, pack up
    10:00am – Hotel check out, leave bags
    11:00am – Lunch, NT$150
    12:30pm – Puyuma train to Taipei, NT$440
    03:30pm – MRT to Airport, NT$160
    04:30pm – Flight check in

    This itinerary will cost you at least NT$2600 (USD85, SGD116, PHP4600, EUR73), excluding airfare and hotel.

    If you spend NT$600 per night per person on accommodations, the itinerary above will set you back at least NT$3800 (USD125, SGD170, PHP6700, EUR106), excluding airfare and tips.

    If you’re flying from Manila and you’re able to snag a roundtrip ticket for only P5000, this itinerary will cost you PHP11,700. You can get something much much lower when there’s a sale.


    Hualien-Taipei Itineraries

    If you want to visit Hualien and Taipei in one trip, we have prepared several sample itineraries for that in a separate post.

    READ: TAIPEI-HUALIEN ITINERARIES


    More Hualien Tips for the Poor Traveler

    Sample Locker Code
    • There are lockers at Taipei Main Station. If you’re visiting Hualien from Taipei and you don’t want to bring your heavy bags with you all the way, you can leave them at the Main Station. In the same way, if you’re coming from Hualien and you want to explore Taipei before your exit flight, you can leave your bags inside a locker and wander around the city baggage-free. I’ve tried this myself. Most lockers will give you a small printout of the code. Take a photo of the code immediately just in case you lose it. Price: NT$20 per hour.
    • If you’re on a budget, eat at small eateries instead of restaurants or cafes. Several of these eateries can be found throughout the city. They serve cheap pre-cooked food. They usually have small trays which they fill with 2-3 dishes. They’re super cheap, like NTD70 per full meal.
    • Have NTD or USD before coming to Taiwan. Only banks and/or licensed stores are allowed to do currency exchanges, and they don’t accept peso. If you fail to bring NTDs, you can exchange at the airport or withdraw from ATM. We prefer withdrawing from ATM.
    • Get an Easy Card if you’re visiting Taroko Gorge on your own. EasyCard is Taiwan’s IC card, similar to Hong Kong’s Octopus card, Singapore’s EZ card, or Japan’s ICOCA, PASMO, or SUICA. You can get one at convenience stores like 7-Eleven and Family Mart and MRT stations. Cost of the card is NT$100. You will have to load it with credits first before you use it.
    • Prepare for language barrier. Many locals, including many taxi drivers, do not understand English at all. Make sure you have a Translation app on your phone or ask hotel staff to write down the name of the destination for you.

    Our Hualien Travel Slam Book

    • Best thing about Hualien: The vibe. It’s a city but it’s quiet and idyllic. It’s coastal but it also has a strong mountain feel to it. It’s one of those cities where I could see myself staying for good.
    • Something about Hualien that you don’t like: Crazy unpredictable weather. We visited in late February/early March, and these are two of the driest months supposedly (relatively, at least), but it would still rain a lot. They don’t last long, but it can put a damper on plans.
    • Most unforgettable moment: There’s this spot in Tianxiang that was highly recommended by Fong, the owner of the hostel where we were staying. He drew a map, wrote the name of the spot in Chinese, and told us to go there. We didn’t know what to expect or what would be waiting for us there but we followed it. We found the start of the trail in the form of a flight of stairs into the woods. Before we knew it, we were climbing this mountain. Hahaha. We were so not prepared for it! Some parts were really steep. We passed through a bamboo forest and had a view of an entrenched meander. We’re not sure if this was the view that Fong was talking about but it was breathtaking. I just wish we knew it would be quite the trek. We even had to rappel at one point. LOL.
    • Favorite meal. It’s not really a meal, but I enjoyed sampling a lot of different dishes at the night market. My favorite though are candy-coated strawberries on a stick. Haha.
    • Biggest surprise. Train ride to and from Taipei. The view of the Taiwanese countryside is just wow. I was planning on catching some sleep on the train but I wasn’t able to because I was enjoying the view.
    • Biggest disappointment. We never got to try any of the cafes. There are so many of them in Hualien and we really wanted to try at least one, but we just couldn’t find the time.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Is Hualien safe?

    Yes, Taipei is very safe generally. But as in other places, follow the rules and don’t leave your things unattended.


    What is tipping policy in Hualien?

    Tipping is NOT mandatory or expected in Hualien. At restaurants, a 10% service charge is usually already added to the bill so no tips necessary. Taxi drivers don’t expect to be tipped either, but you can just round off the meter.


    Where to exchange money in Hualien?

    If you’re carrying US dollars or another major currency, you can exchange at banks or licensed stores.

    If you’re carrying Philippine peso, it will be hard to find one that accepts peso. If you can, buy NTD before your trip so you’re covered. If you fail to bring NTDs, you can withdraw from ATM.


    What is the power socket used in Hualien?

    110V, 60Hz. Type A sockets are most common. Plugs have two flat pins. Type B, with an extra hole for a grounding prong, is also usual.


    Do I need a visa to visit Taiwan?

    If you’re carrying a Philippine passport, no need for a visa or a travel authorization certificate. You may enter Taiwan VISA-FREE until July 31, 2019, provided that your visit is no longer than 14 days and that you meet the following requirements.

    1. Your passport must have at least 6 months validity.
    2. A return ticket or onward ticket (to your next destination and a visa for that destination)
    3. A proof of accommodation. It may be hotel booking or host’s contact information or tour arrangements
    4. You must have no criminal record in Taiwan

    Nationals of Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam need to get an ROC Travel Authorization Certificate (aka Visa-Free Certificate).

    • It is valid for 90 days.
    • Each stay must be not longer than 30 days.
    • It can be used for multiple entries.
    • It is FREE.

    The whole process takes 5-10 minutes. Here’s how to get one: Travel Authorization Certificate.



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    Yoshke Dimen

    Yoshke Dimen

    Storyteller at Yoshke.com
    Yoshke is a part-time digital marketing consultant, part-time travel blogger, and full-time dreamer. He has three passions in life: social media, travel, and --- wait for it --- world peace. Yoshke has won 3 PHILIPPINE BLOG AWARDS and received 9 nominations. Learn more about his personal journeys at Yoshke.com.
    Yoshke Dimen

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